WORK PROGRESS

Starting 28th February, Gearbox moved from Bishop Magua on Ngong Road to Avon Center on Enterprise Road in Industrial area.

Change is inevitable. Gearbox moved to a 20,000 sq.ft of common and private space that will be available for renting .More so, better equipment will be available as purchase of bigger, effective equipment will be advised. Building of bigger prototypes will also be accommodated as the large space will have room for relatively larger masterpieces.

With the close proximity to Industrial area, raw materials and supplies will be easy to access, creating a profit base for all the innovation start ups.

At Avon Center, the ground floor is being remodeled into a mechanical workshop. The workshop will house: a metal station, wood station, plastic station, painting, hand tools and stores. As per now, a strong floor is being laid to support all the mechanical machinery.

The first floor is being prepared to host: offices, boardroom, working station and design lab.

Ground floor progress

Ground floor progress

Temporal elecrical space

Temporal elecrical space

Team meeting to set strategy on progress

Team meeting to set strategy on progress

DEPUTY STATE HOUSE COMPTROLLER VISITS GEARBOX

George Kariuki, the Deputy State House Comptroller, recently paid our makerspace a visit. Here is a quick review.

Gearbox Executive Director, Dr. Kamau Gachigi, welcomes Statehouse deputy comptroller, George Kariuki, to the makerspace

Gearbox Executive Director, Dr. Kamau Gachigi, welcomes Statehouse deputy comptroller, George Kariuki, to the makerspace

George kariuki acess the Juakaliscope

George kariuki acess the Juakaliscope

Sheila Wangari, a form four leaverdemonstrates the plasma cutter

Sheila Wangari, a form four leaverdemonstrates the plasma cutter

From right Brenda Livoi, Gearbox mechanical lead, George Kariuki and Ester Wanjiru, a Gearbox intern during the demonstration of the CNC milling machine

From right Brenda Livoi, Gearbox mechanical lead, George Kariuki and Ester Wanjiru, a Gearbox intern during the demonstration of the CNC milling machine

The electrical team demonstrates how to use a pick and place machine

The electrical team demonstrates how to use a pick and place machine

THE HYBRID CNC

With passion and interest in mechanical engineering, Simon Wachira, head of engineering at Gearbox, built the Hybrid CNC (Computer Numerical Control): a CNC that is both a pro-cut (plasma CNC) and pro-curve (router CNC) for Gearbox.

He worked with his company, Proteq Automation Limited, that is on the forefront of offering the latest industrial automation technology, industrial machine manufacture and product development among others.

This CNC cut costs to a third as compared to purchasing a CNC for each and fitted effortlessly on a relatively smaller space.

Simon believes in borrowing technology to make things that meet a customers desire.

A demo of the hybrid CNC

PRESIDENT ANDREJ KISKA TOURS GEARBOX

Gearbox hosted the President of Slovakia, Andrej Kiska, as he paid the iHub community a visit to get acquainted with tech start ups in the makerspace, with an intent of possible partnership and funding.

Slovakia is well known for it's car manufacturing industry as well as electrical engineering. Since 2007, Slovakia has been the world's largest producer of cars per capita.

He toured our makerspace and had a chance to interact with our innovators.

Here is a quick review of the event.

Gearbox Executive Director, Dr. Kamau Gachigi, welcomes the Slovakia President, Andrej Kiska, to Gearbox

Gearbox Executive Director, Dr. Kamau Gachigi, welcomes the Slovakia President, Andrej Kiska, to Gearbox

President Andrej Kiska assessing Karl Heinz's Juakaliscope

President Andrej Kiska assessing Karl Heinz's Juakaliscope

Michael Gathogo explaining the Fetoscope

Michael Gathogo explaining the Fetoscope

President Andrej Kiska being taken through a demo of the hybrid CNC router and plasma cutter made at Gearbox

President Andrej Kiska being taken through a demo of the hybrid CNC router and plasma cutter made at Gearbox

President Andrej Kiska being taken through a chilli gun demo

President Andrej Kiska being taken through a chilli gun demo

President Andrej Kiska receiving a gift from Gearbox

President Andrej Kiska receiving a gift from Gearbox

THE ESVENDO PROJECT

Approximately 3 million school days are lost each month due to lack of sanitary towels. Esther Mwangi started Esvendo- a social enterprise that aims to increase access to sanitary towels through vending machines that girls can use to purchase sanitary towels, promptly tackling this demise.

During the pilot phase, Esvendo used three kiosk outlets in Kibera and was able to serve 500 users. By introducing custom made vending machines and working with the safe spaces, they expect to reach at least 18,000 girls over one year and sell over 5000 vending machines in two years.

The Esvendo machine

The Esvendo machine

The Esvendo machine provides sanitary towels to girls  at a low price. With a ten shilling coin, any girl can purchase a sanitary towel.

A purchase demo

A purchase demo

A purchase demo

A purchase demo

Esther has already placed an Esvendo machine at Binti Pamoja in Kibera, a community center for young girls. She aims to install another at Darajani near Kibera Girls Soccer Academy and more of them over time.

Esther Mwangi with the Evendo machine at Binti Pamoja in Kibera

Esther Mwangi with the Evendo machine at Binti Pamoja in Kibera

In addition, this project will also provide health education and economic empowerment workshops for both women and girls in the informal settlements.

Esvendo is targeting rural and urban settlement areas that don’t have access to shopping centers, hospitals and schools.Esther aims to promote accessibility of sanitary towels without limitation.

Makernet Event

On the evening of February 10th, makers in the Health Sector converged at the Gearbox offices to share their inventions which have helped combat some of the issues facing the Health industry in Kenya.
The event was organized by Makernet, a consortium whose main focus is to link makers and maker-spaces to the market.

From left Makernet team Anna Lowe, Andrew Lamb, Michael Gathogo, Jessica Berlin & Gearbox Executive Director Dr. Kamau Gachigi

From left Makernet team Anna Lowe, Andrew Lamb, Michael Gathogo, Jessica Berlin & Gearbox Executive Director Dr. Kamau Gachigi

The purpose of the event was to introduce the just-concluded 4-month pilot project whose highlights included making health devices that could be utilized locally. A similar project is already in operation in Nepal.

The Makernet team interacting with some of the guests in attendance

The Makernet team interacting with some of the guests in attendance

St. Patrick Health Centre Director Mr. Patrick Maina listens attentively during the Makernet presentations.

St. Patrick Health Centre Director Mr. Patrick Maina listens attentively during the Makernet presentations.

Mechanical engineer Sato explains how his Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor device works during the Makernet event

Mechanical engineer Sato explains how his Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor device works during the Makernet event

Some of the devices they have successfully created include kidney trays, foetal scopes, centrifugal tubes, to name a few. These devices have already been tested out in the field.
St.Patrick Health Care Centre in Kayole and Amua Family Health Clinic in Kajiado have been beneficiaries of this initiative.

Makernet team member Michael Gathogo demonstrates how he makes copies of the kidney trays using acrylic material. (demo)

Makernet team member Michael Gathogo demonstrates how he makes copies of the kidney trays using acrylic material. (demo)

Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor

With a background in Mechanical Engineering, Sato Bonface Kariuki has been able to put his skills to the test, by coming up with a Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor, whose sole purpose is to detect the heart-rate of a foetus, and at the same time be able to tell the mother's blood pressure, throughout the 9 months expectancy period.

Mechanical engineer, Sato Bonface Kariuki

Mechanical engineer, Sato Bonface Kariuki

The project which is the idea of four (4) individuals, including an engineer, a nurse, a public health person and an I.T person, under the umbrella body of 4-month old start-up company,
Jalbit Tech, was developed after they discovered through research the high mortality rate of unborn children throughout the country.

Sato working on the wiring system on the Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor

Sato working on the wiring system on the Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor

Some of the factors that contributed to this were:
1. The duration between antenatal check-ups was too long, i.e. every 2 weeks.
2. Congestion in maternal health centres/clinics. This resulted in expectant women choosing to
skip clinic visits.

These factors resulted in the children having underdeveloped organs and others being distressed.

Although the project is currently at the pilot phase,it is believed to be a great solution to the stated issues, especially since the mothers-to-be will be able to use the device at their
own convenience, and from the comfort of their homes.

An expectant mother testing out the Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor

An expectant mother testing out the Foetal Heart-Rate Monitor


In addition, once it has rolled out, it will be retailing at an affordable price, so as to cater for people from all walks of life.

The Juakaliscope

With deep interest in 3D printed products, Karl Heinz has revolutionized the health and education sector by making the Juakaliscope – a 3D printed microscope which is portable, locally available and accessible at a cheaper price.

The Juakaliscope

The Juakaliscope

After completion of his higher education as a mechanical engineer, he used his knowledge and skills to venture into business. In two years, he has built and distributed his own 3D printers and subsequently started a mass production of Juakaliscopes.

Karl working on Juakaliscope

Karl working on Juakaliscope

Karl's 3D printer printing the Juakaliscope

Karl's 3D printer printing the Juakaliscope

Karl Heinz makes two types of microscopes: the student kit and medical kit, which vary in magnification. He prototypes the microscopes at Gearbox and tests them before mass production.

These microscopes can be used to conduct water tests, medical and livestock diagnosis.

Unlike typical microscopes, the Juakaliscope uses a USB cable to connect to a phone or PC. The specimen is viewed on the screen and preferably sent to a doctor for review or projected for study.

A specimen on the Juakaliscope

A specimen on the Juakaliscope

Demonstrating the Juakaliscope on a PC

Demonstrating the Juakaliscope on a PC

Lately, Karl has been working with Sidai Africa to revolutionize the provision of livestock and veterinary services to farmers in Kenya with the aim of creating a more sustainable service delivery. Farmers can now send their specimen to vets for diagnostic review from the comfort of their farms.In the near future, Karl aims to extend his reach to Central Africa.

Partner with us for a good cause

Gearbox hosted an interactive session with Hakob Arshakyan from National Instruments, known widely for Labview System Design Software and instrumentation products. He showcased solutions that can help accelerate systems engineering learning and productivity.

National Instruments offered Gearbox a six months licence of Labview Systems Design Software for member learning and use.

Gearbox provides a compelling platform for international equipment and software vendors in the hardware space to showcase their products and potentially influence future buying decisions.

Vendors are welcome to email us at info@gearbox.co.ke with partnership offers.

Gearbox as a fab lab

Gearbox is offering a fab lab platform for fab academy, with activities such as technological empowerment, peer-to-peer project-based technical training, local problem-solving and small-scale high-tech business incubation.

Laser cutting in progress

Laser cutting in progress

Fab academy is a distributed platform of education and research, in which each fab lab operates as a classroom and the planet as the campus of the largest University in construction in the world. Students learn about the principles, applications and implications of digital manufacturing technology.

The fab academy program runs for 6 months and students learn how to envision and prototype then document their projects and ideas through many hours of hands-on experience with digital fabrication after which, certificates are awarded on relevant technical topics and an ultimate fab Diploma when all topics are completed.

Empowered by the fab academy program, users can use Gearbox for fast paced, hands-on learning experience to plan and execute their weekly projects.

CNC miling machine 

CNC miling machine 

Students learn and mentor each other, gaining deep knowledge about the machines, the materials, the design process, and the engineering that goes into invention and innovation.

While building their fab academy portfolio of mastery of skills, gearbox gives students an opportunity to be effectively equipped and efficient by providing the makerspace, supplementary knowledge and technical assistance.

computer controlled drilling and milling machine

Gearbox 3D printer

Gearbox 3D printer

Sketch to prototype meetup

Gearbox hosted the Sketch to Prototype meet up to provide a networking opportunity for engineers, students, makers and entrepreneurs.

participants of the sketch to prototype meet up

participants of the sketch to prototype meet up

The theme was centered around bridging the gap between an idea to prototyping a product that meets the needs of a consumer.

During the session, we had an opportunity to listen to maker stories from various participants.

Karl Heinz, a Gearbox maker, makes 3D printed microscopes which are portable, cost-effective and easy to repair, qualities essential in remote health centers.

Karl,illustrates his 3d printed microscopes

Karl,illustrates his 3d printed microscopes

Yassin Bare, from BRCK, headlined the session by taking the audience through a brief history of kio kit from a product development perspective to the well known education technology solution; a digital classroom.

“Kio kit is a simple and elegant solution made up of 40 Kio tablets, a BRCK, a wireless tablet charging to reduce breakage and a hardened, water-resistant, lockable case. There is a single plug used to charge the kit and one button to power on the entire system,” he explained.

Barre showing the kio kit

Barre showing the kio kit

Apollo Sande, Gearbox Community Lead, took the opportunity to mobilize members of the audience to participate in the Jijiplan initiative aimed at improving quality of life through collaborative learning, trading and investing.

More discussions and progress will be facilitated by the Gearbox Forum.


 

 

Chege's Pre-seed Funding Experience

Dr. Kamau Gachigi, Gearbox Executive Director, admiring George Chege’s product

Dr. Kamau Gachigi, Gearbox Executive Director, admiring George Chege’s product

George Chege is a Gearbox member working on a smart controller to improve efficiency of chick brooders. He successfully completed a Bsc. in Biosystems Engineering at the University of Nairobi in 2016.

He has had an exciting and inspiring journey transitioning from a university student innovator where family support was a given, to post university graduation where he has to justify developing his project instead of looking for a job.

Fortunately, Chege’s father is a seasoned businessman and professional marketer who understands the risk and reward of private enterprise.

After obediently making job applications, Chege managed to persuade his family for support, winning over his father who is now a business partner, investor and leads product marketing.

This took demonstrating dedication to complete the project, meeting potential customers with his father to assess market feedback - which has been very positive, and formulating a smart action plan together.

They are now pilot testing.

For any recent university graduates with compelling ideas, what would it take to win the support of your friends and family to develop your idea into a product?

MICHAEL, MAKERNET.

Michael Gathogo is the project coordinator of the MakerNet pilot in Kenya, a product designer, entrepreneur as well as a Gearbox member.

Michael working on his projects at Gearbox.

Michael working on his projects at Gearbox.

Before Gearbox, he designed a range of products such as CladLight, a medical delivery drone and circular economy solutions.

At Gearbox, Michael specializes in digital fabrication, 3D printing, CAD modelling, CNC milling and tooling.

In recent times, he has dedicated his time to health and humanitarian acts. He has been repairing, improving and innovating health assist-hardware. Consequently, visiting a few hospitals to test his prototypes as well as repair broken equipment.

3D printed medical devices

3D printed medical devices

Before and after repair of a hospital oxygen flow meter

Before and after repair of a hospital oxygen flow meter

 Repair of a hospital sunction unit.

 Repair of a hospital sunction unit.

Repair of a centrifuge.

Repair of a centrifuge.

Fetoscopes (foetal stethoscopes – used to listen to a baby’s heartbeat in the womb)

Fetoscopes (foetal stethoscopes – used to listen to a baby’s heartbeat in the womb)

Michael at St. Maria Maternity clinic to test the fetoscope.

Michael at St. Maria Maternity clinic to test the fetoscope.

Repair of an Electric Autoclave.

Repair of an Electric Autoclave.

Android Things meetup

The Gearbox Android Things and post-CES 2017 review meetup was a success with developers, freelancers and students all geared up for training on embedded systems development.

The Android Things meetup was the first of its kind for local developers.

Developers working on Raspberry Pi 3 and Intel Edison at Gearbox

Developers working on Raspberry Pi 3 and Intel Edison at Gearbox

We introduced development boards such as Raspberry Pi 3 and Intel Edison.

The session was centred on developing Android applications for the Android Things platform. Developers had an opportunity to set up their development environment and deploy applications on to the platform.

Alfred Ongere talked about augmented and virtual reality technology such as Project Alloy which allows users to experience mixed reality.

Both augmented reality and virtual reality can find use cases in real-estate, land sale, expeditions, education and more.

Alfred Ongere, (ISP-MMU) demonstrating Samsung gear V.R headset

Alfred Ongere, (ISP-MMU) demonstrating Samsung gear V.R headset

Mixed reality will allow an engineer to design, visualize, annotate and improve their prototypes before production.

Intel Compute Card

Intel Compute Card

He further explained about the Intel Compute Card which is slightly longer than a credit card at 95mm by 55mm by 5mm and with a range of processor families in the works. It offers an optimal solution to power everything from entry level to full featured host device.

Later on, after the IoT session, audiences were treated to a fireside chat where they discussed blockchain technology, artificial intelligence, self driving cars and many others.

Fireside chat with (from left): Bob Afwata, Apollo Sande and Duncan Muchiri

Fireside chat with (from left): Bob Afwata, Apollo Sande and Duncan Muchiri

On future meetups, the developers will be taken through thorough sessions in bid to enable developers prototype IoT solutions from ground-up. This Meetups and hands on sessions will be hosted, delivered and coordinated by Gearbox at our premises.

We would like to thank Bob Afwata, Alfred Ongere, Kennedy Otieno and Duncan Muchiri for making this meeting a success.

Innovate4Wildlife

Last year in December we had a chance to innovate for the unluckiest of beings. We innovated for wildlife, partnering with Wildlife Direct, we gathered experts in different fields – conservationists, community workers, engineers, county administration, Kenya Wildlife Service, community members, and more, and held the “Innovate4wildlife” workshop at Amboseli in a bid to seek innovative solutions towards human-wildlife conflict (HWC).

Participants at the workshop 

Participants at the workshop 

Over the past few years, human interest in farming and livestock keeping has affected the existence of wildlife in their natural sanctuary, and has resulted in frequent HWC with deaths recorded on both sides. Increasing human populations have added more pressure on the limited natural resource land, leading to individuals cultivating on land that has previously been wild animals’ corridors and grazing areas for livestock. The change in lifestyle from pastoralism to more sedentary forms of living has compounded this problem with the otherwise nomadic Pastoralists taking up and fencing huge tracks of land in these areas for farming.

Along with the reducing vegetation cover in the area, this has forced wild animals, especially elephants, giraffes, and others, to invade these farms and feed on farmers’ crops. Thanks to the age-old problem of predators preying on livestock, inhabitants of these areas have been at war with these wild animals, which has resulted in losses to our wildlife resource, losses to farmers, and even death as a result of HWC.

Amboseli ecosystem being the only biosphere in Kenya that human beings and wildlife coexist in the same land with over 75% of the animals living withing the community owned group ranches, has been one of the worst affected with HWC. All it takes is a herd of elephants rumbling through acres of farmland to destroy crops worth millions and a whole year of food for a community. Pastoralist have also been dealing with huge loss of livestock under the mercies of predators such as lions, jackals, hyenas, etc. So, it’s no surprise that the community who were once living peacefully with these animals are resorting to violent ways of protecting their livelihoods and the wild animals are retaliating when attacked.

In this workshop, all energies were geared towards developing innovative, non-violent, low-cost, and low-tech solutions toward HWC that can be taken up and produced by the community as an income earner and help in keeping elephants from wandering into agricultural fields, predators away from bomas, and hence reduce deadly encounters and confrontations with farmers in the Amboseli ecosystem.

All partners on board went through stages of problem solving with a focus on human-centered design; all innovations were to be designed in such a manner that would favor the human in protecting their homes and resources and be harmless to wild animals. Problem identification, persona categorization, research and exploration of different solutions and ideation exercises for prototype making were employed through the workshop, and we developed several prototypes to solve this problem that would later be iterated and refined at Gearbox.

Participants during a fact-finding exercise.

Participants during a fact-finding exercise.

An audio scare crow was among the prototypes developed. Although Elephants are big, the mere buzzing of bees is enough to send a herd running off. The audio played pre-recorded sounds that scared away the elephants and gradually sent the herd away.

Dr. Ciira demonstrating how the audion scarecrow works

Dr. Ciira demonstrating how the audion scarecrow works

We improvised an existing technique of using chili guns to shoot plastic balls filled with chili powder at invading elephants. The guns used before were modified paintball guns which used compressed air canisters and chili balls which were expensive to acquire. Our improvised Chili gun made use of plastic pipes mostly used for irrigation purposes, a foot pump, and 3D printed plastic balls filled with chili, all of which are locally available and performed equally as well as the guns used before. 

Harrison displays how the chili gun works.

Harrison displays how the chili gun works.

The predator alarm sensor wrist band is a prototype that senses heat waves emitted by predators e.g. lions, jackals, and hyenas, then alerts herders to divert their livestock from danger. From a safe distance the wrist band could collect the waves from lurking predators alerting herders in ample time to move their livestock away from danger.

Predator alarm sensor (PAS)

Predator alarm sensor (PAS)

The team came up with predator solar lights that bomas can use at night to keep away predators. Energy absorbed by the solar panels is used to light lamps designed to imitate a guard with a torch walking a homestead through the night, deterring predators from attacking the bomas.

Predator solar lights

Predator solar lights

A pepper dung with launcher is a smoldering mixture of elephant dung and pepper. When shot at a herd of elephants, it irritates their senses keeping them away from farms. Elephants don't like capsaicin, the chemical in chilies that makes them hot. This is a cheap method, with readily available materials to make deterrents like briquettes of crushed chili and animal dung.

Pepper dung with launcher 

The prototypes will further be refined at Gearbox to production quality and funds are being sourced to empower the community especially local women groups to produce and sell them to the community generating income leveraging on the locally available materials used to produce them.

A little fun-time after work

A little fun-time after work

First Ever Guts’n’Glory Competition Winner

This month's winner -- Luide Kakembo

This month's winner -- Luide Kakembo

Last week, we held the first Guts’n’Glory night competition at Gearbox, and it was a rousing success! Nine contestants presented a slew of great ideas they would like to build at Gearbox ranging from hydroponics testing rigs to interactive art displays, from solar-powered off-grid refrigeration to IoT water sensors. The judges – made up of our first 10 generous donors who contributed a total of 50,000 KSh towards the prize – had a hard time of it. Each and every contestant gave a solid pitch, despite only having five minutes to get their idea across.

Ultimately, the presentation that won the vote was Luide Kakembo’s proposal to build a low-cost, multipurpose quadcopter using a carbon fiber frame. Aside from the obvious potential, both in the market and in impact, of light UAV’s (unmanned aerial vehicles), Luide showed a clear understanding of the challenges presented by building one in Kenya's current regulatory environment. His pitch was thorough and well-said, and ultimately convinced the voters of the value of his project, the benefit he would see in working at Gearbox, and the feasibility of making substantial progress over the next month.

Guts’n’Glory is a monthly competition held at Gearbox to help those with strong ideas for things they want to build get to the next step in their projects. Contestants get five minutes to present their idea to an audience made up of individuals who have donated towards the prize, who then vote on their favorite. The prize is made up of all the donations raised by the audience that month – this month it was 50,000 KSh – plus a one-month 3rd Gear membership to Gearbox and a month’s worth of free classes. 

The winner must then report back on the progress they've been able to make over the next month. We can't wait to see what Luide comes up with!

If you’ve got an idea for something you’d like to build at Gearbox, next month’s Guts’n’Glory night will happen on November 29th. Submissions are open now at http://www.gearbox.co.ke/gutsnglory-night. If you’d like to contribute towards this month’s prize and be a part of choosing the winner, contact paul@gearbox.co.ke. You could make a real difference and an immediate impact on the next wave of Kenyan inventors, designers, engineers, and entrepreneurs!

Guts'n'Glory Night is your chance to win 50,000 KSh!

Guts'n'Glory Night at Gearbox -- Oct. 25, 6:30pm - 9pm

Win 50,000 KSh, a full month's membership to Gearbox, and all your classes free!

This month, we're kicking off a monthly event that could give you everything you need to get started making things at Gearbox. On Tuesday, October 25th, up to 10 contestants will have the chance to present something they want to make to an audience eager to help them build it. The winner will walk away with 50,000 KSh to use towards building their project, a full month's 3rd Gear Membership to Gearbox, and all of the free classes they can take in that time (a ~36,000 KSh value).

Money for materials, access to tools and equipment, and training how to use it -- you won't have any excuses left for not making your dream a reality!

We want to help you make great things, and it turns out, so do a lot of people in our community. The prize money for Guts'n'Glory Night will be raised from donations each month from people you know, right here in Nairobi. This month, we've raised 50,000 KSh to offer as a prize. That's 50,000 KSh you can use to purchase materials, get parts made, order components, or do whatever else you need to do in order to move your project forward.

What's the catch, you ask? The winner will be determined by the people who donate the prize. Each contestant will have 5 minutes to present their idea at the event using whatever means they have at their disposal (props, slides, or their charming personality). The audience will then vote on their favorite idea to win. Only people who have donated will be allowed to vote, so your pitch needs to win their hearts!

The competition is open to anyone, of any background or experience level. There's no paperwork, no long application form, and no prerequisites. We're making it as easy as possible to get started making things -- just fill out the form on the page below to submit your name for the event.

We also need to send out a huge thank you to the generous donors who have contributed to this month's prize! We're planning to do this every month, so if you want to get involved, just let us know!

Announcing New Hours and Membership Plans!

Starting October 3, Gearbox will be open seven days a week.

You've been asking for it, and the day is finally here. Starting today, Gearbox will be open from 9am to 9pm, Monday through Friday, and 9am to 7pm on Saturday and Sunday. 

While working in Gearbox is a full-time job for some of our members, we know many of you aren't able to get away between the hours of 10 and 6 to learn how to use the laser cutter or whip up a PCB. Well, now we're inviting you to pop over after work, or spend your weekend building a prototype of that new invention you've been dreaming about for months.

We're also launching a whole new membership model to suit your schedule and budget. You can now choose from four membership options:

Student Memberships -- 1,000 KSh/month
Access the space any one (1) day per week.

1st Gear Memberships -- 4,000 KSh/month
Access the space any two (2) days per week, Monday through Friday only.

2nd Gear Memberships -- 6,000 KSh/month
Access the space all day Saturday and Sunday, and after 5pm Monday through Friday.

3rd Gear Memberships -- 10,000 KSh/month
Access the space all day, seven (7) days per week.

It's never been easier in Kenya to learn, design, and build anything you can imagine. Gearbox is open to anyone and everyone, so sign up now!